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A Smartwatch With A Difference

Clad in a brown coloured sweater at Stand E11 at the Baselworld 2019 was CEO of Veldt, Jin Nonogami. He was bent double over his desk checking some of the watches he was about to place on display.

His countenance brightened he sighted me. I told him I was interested in the watch on display. We struck a conversation immediately. He was happy to tell me more about the new collection Veldt, his watch Maison presented at the Baselworld 2019. 

His novelty at the Baselworld is the Luxture Vega Series, an elegant, casual series for women.

 “In the ancient time, time was measured by the sunlight,” he says of the concept behind Luxture. Over time machines took over the role of measuring time, which became one of the information tools in the internet era. Among so much information, we are continually trying to find something important to us, lights, rather than words. Luxture is a new element that conveys meaningful messages with lights.”


Founded in 2012, Veldt later released unique connected watches in the Winter of 2014, even before the very first Apple Watch was released. Ever since, Veldt has been focusing on wrist-wear, IoT devices and services on wrists. 


In 2019, Veldt is taking the next step in its evolution. “We are motivated to innovate the sense of ‘Connected & Beautiful’, Nonogami, tells me, “beauty in the Internet-driven generation. While our lives have gotten much more efficient due to smartphone technology, people today are faced with newer issues such as digital stress from over-flooding of information, internet addiction, smartphone induced accidents. To support you make the most of your beautiful time for your body and soul, we think our society needs to prioritize innovation in how we interact with technology over just innovation in the technology itself. For the remarkable future in the connected society.”


Veldt first collection named Serendipity is an unexpected discovery. It is a valuable experience for people in the smartphone world who often fail to witness or experience the real world as their eyes are always on their mobile phones. To have them place their eyes away from the phone screens and spend quality time in the real world, Veldt released the very first product Serendipity.
Serendipity is the first connected watch designed.

It is a Japan-made smartwatch, with texts and Led lights hidden in the analogue dial intuitively conveying essential smartphone information. “We added Touchwear Series, designed for a new mobile payment function in the belt,” explains Nonogami. “Embedded into the analogue face of the watch, our unique Led Vivid Loop syncs with online information, and lights up to intuitively inform you of incoming messages or information of priority.”


The watch comes with a luxurious bracelet. The beautifully weaved mesh is made in Germany while the denim is handmade by a skilled Kyoto kimono dyeing craftsmanAlso, the unique bracelet is made using a very thin natural stone. The leather is vivid and beautiful high-quality leathers sourced from Europe. The rubber bracelet is made for luxury dive watches from Austria.


Furthermore, the unique feature of Veldt Serendipity is the touch wear card system which makes mobile payment possible just by tapping.


“Veldt touch wear contains our unique FeliCa chip (Veldt Touchwear Card) on the back of the belt, which enables you to complete a mobile payment just by tapping. No need to charge the electronic money part. You can make a payment with Veldt Touchwear wherever Rakuten Edy is accepted such as at convenience stores, restaurants and cafés,” he explains.


Serendipity comes with an intuitive and easy-to-use App. The App enables users’ activity history to be shown on their calendar along with their schedule. “Activity and sleep levels are displayed in the form of bubbles, and you can see your biorhythm of the month by entering how you feel every day. You can select your model in the device setting page and assign frequently used functions to shortcut buttons for quick access,” adds Nonogami.

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